The Book of Job

Message
Author
Mos_Feo_Appareo

The Book of Job

#1 Postby Mos_Feo_Appareo » Wed Oct 08, 2014 3:52 pm

While reading the story of Job, we find that Satan "comes along" with the "sons of God" and God asks Satan "where have you been?" Satan then explains that he's been roaming the earth and so forth. Next, God authorizes Satan to "test" Job by various means to see if he'll curse God. So, in this story, it appears that Satan is taking orders from God and is not disobeying God or opposing (him). Basically, Satan is setting up the challenge - and that's about it(besides administering the various tests). By the end of story, Satan is long gone and does not suffer as result of losing the challenge.

Satan the Bad Guy/Accuser
Looking at this story literally, I have to wonder: why does Satan come along with the sons of God - are they friends? Or did they all just arrive at the same time to present themselves to God? Also, if God is all-knowing; why does God need to ask Satan where he's been? Additionally, why does God authorize Satan to torture poor Job, when Job was "blameless and upright?"
Ah yes!!!!!! - the standard response: to test the veracity of Job's faith during good times and bad! You'll hear this moral at most funerals and when tragedy occurs. There's supposed to be some kind of comfort to be found in the notion that Job survives some of the worst tortures imaginable (all his children are killed, painful boils all over his body, etc.), but yet, he still keeps the faith.
In other words, don't you dare curse God, even though (he) has authorized Satan to make you as miserable as possible. Therefore, you must prove yourself worthy before God will bless you - this sounds like Oz telling Dorothy that before he grants her wish, she must prove herself worthy by killing the witch - when she had the power to return home by clicking her heels :-)

Since there is an absence of logic to the story, it seems futile to hone-in on Satan as having an in-depth characterization in the Hebrew Bible. Rather, it appears that the storyteller is creating this character to say that it's okay to challenge the God of the Bible - whereas gods before this time could not be challenged. In other words, this God is willing to see how events play themselves out, and (he) allows human beings to make their own decisions about how they choose to relate to God. This is and was quite a progressive development in the evolution of Western theology.

Job the "Blameless and Upright"
If you read Job 1:4-5, you'll find that Job allows his seven sons and three daughters to feast (party) quite a bit, and we are told that they sin and blaspheme God in their hearts. Now, if Job was so "upright and blameless" - why didn't he stop this type of "sinful" behavior?" - it certainly doesn't take much imagination to understand what the writer is insinuating. Nope - Job just stands by and allows his children to keep on sinning. Therefore, maybe Job is not as "blameless and upright" as we might think.

Consequently, Job's lack of parental intervention could very well be the cause of all his troubles(Karma 101 right there especially in context of the story!!!!). So maybe the lesson is Turn your back and ignore Gods hurt, the very same is perhaps Gods way of returning the favor?

Anyway, it's an interesting theory to consider.

sheryl
Site Admin
Posts: 889
Joined: Sat Feb 14, 2004 11:56 am
Location: Grass Valley, CA
Contact:

Re: The Book of Job..... the not so innocent.

#2 Postby sheryl » Thu Oct 09, 2014 1:33 pm

Greetings!

I too feel as you have offered, Sister: Job does not abide fully in righteousness. And one does wonder if his response to the sins of his children - offering prayers and burnt offerings after the fact - indicates a lack of proper action for one of his standing.

Recently, something of our lineage's teachings regarding Job were given during a Zohar discourse, teachings that shed much light on the story of Job. According to our lineage's tradition, Job lived in Egypt and was an advisor to Pharaoh when the children of Israel had grown in size and become troublesome to Pharaoh, who then was considering ridding Egypt of Israel through annihilation. It is taught that Job had Pharaoh's ear, and thinking himself wise advised that Israel instead be made slaves of Egypt. Here was a man of God, in a position of power, able to bring in potential, destiny, something greater, but instead sought his own glory, sought to position himself in a place of favor with Pharaoh with his apparent wise advice.

Job, we are told, had been blessed abundantly, was a great man, was a man of God, yet when the metal hit the pedal, chose to seek favor from Pharaoh with his counsel. Self grasping, desire for self alone, apparently darkened his insight. This is the sin of Job, and perhaps the same character that was then reflected in his dealings with his children, just as your insight offers.

And so I see the story of Job now as a story of justice. Through the accuser, Satan, the darkness within Job would be revealed and healed, making the situation righteous.

The teachings by blessed Rabbi Shim'on and his companions in Zohar offer us a deeper insight into the bondage of Israel and the steps needed for their freedom. The bondage was deeper than appearances, arising from the dominions in the spiritual or heavenly realms, so that the plagues visited upon Egypt went right to the root of bondage, destroying the spiritual forces preventing their freedom.

And so it comes to mind that the story in the book of Job is not only about Job, but about these spiritual forces as well - making this wrong right was the beginning of loosening these binds had by the heavenly dominions over Israel.

Greater than this, the stories of Job and of Israel being brought out of bondage, the deeper insights of these offered in our lineage, speak as well to our own bondage, and the workings of Grace in the spiritual realms to bring about our freedom.

Another interesting teaching is that Satan is not separate from any of us, but is likewise the accuser, the keeper of the law, for all of creation - perhaps we can even say offering us insights into our own behaviors that have perpetuated our own bondage.

Praise God for the secret workings of the Holy Spirit!

May the hold of the dominions upon humanity be weakened. May all beings find the truth that will make them free.

With gratitude,

Sheryl

Tau Malachi
Site Admin
Posts: 5738
Joined: Wed Oct 22, 2003 4:20 pm
Location: Grass Valley, Ca.

Re: The Book of Job..... the not so innocent.

#3 Postby Tau Malachi » Fri Oct 10, 2014 1:38 pm

Grace and peace to you in Hayyah Yeshua!

The Book of Job is lovely. It is filled with wisdom and revelations of deep mysteries of creation and God; and yet, at times, it is rather comical, and does provoke a chuckle, such as when one reads the conversation in the heavenly court between the Holy One and Satan, the Adversary.

Truly, though, there is something to take note of concerning comical, or seemingly silly passages of the Holy Scriptures. If understood, typically speaking, revelations of secret mysteries are hidden there for those who have eyes to see and ears to hear.

In the moment, though, I do not find myself attracted to the exchange that occurs in the heavenly court exactly, but rather the overarching question that inspires the writing of this holy book: Why do good people suffer? Why do the righteous suffer? This naturally leads to many other questions concerning suffering, not the least of which is: If God is good, merciful and compassionate, why does God let anyone suffer? Why is there suffering at all in creation?

Before we go looking for a cause created by Job for his suffering let us remember that, at the outset of the story, God proclaims Job good, and righteous, and without blame. The question put forth by Satan is whether or not Job would remain faithful, righteous, if suffering came upon him nevertheless. Thus, according to the beginning of the story, Job does not directly generate cause, or reason, for the suffering that comes upon him, but rather, it just happens.

If we consider the council of his ‘friends,’ again and again they attempt to put blame upon Job for his suffering, and there are suggestions of various ways he may have brought it on himself. Perhaps, joining his ‘friends’ we could speak of the sin, or error, of bad parenting, considering the unrighteousness of his children, but then, is a parent necessarily responsible for the behaviors of an older child, let alone and adult child? In this world it is entirely possible to be a faithful and righteous person and have a difficult, or even wicked child, and there are many individuals who enact great negativity and violence even though they had a good family, and good parents.

You see, the thing is that from the perspective of the Kabbalah everything in creation is a co-arising, which is to say that anything you can name or point at is completely interdependent and interconnected with everything else in creation, and you may even say is an intersection of the influence of everything else in creation. The same is certainly true of situations, circumstances and events. They are created, formed and made by a vast, immeasurable array of influences, or a ‘great web of interdependence.’

This contemplation, of course, swiftly carries us beyond the linear, simplistic understanding of karma into something far more complex, subtle and sublime, understanding many layers and influences to the manifestation of the karmic matrix and continuum; and here we might add that given the exchange between God and Satan, and the presence of the Beni Elohim (“sons of God”) witnessing their exchange, we are taught that the karmic matrix we encounter in this life and world includes the influence of spiritual forces within inner, metaphysical worlds of the astral, spiritual and supernal dimensions. Thus, it is not just a matter of the choices made and things set into action by sentient beings in the material dimension, but also choices and actions of sentient beings, spiritual forces, in the inner dimensions; hence, a very vast array of influences and powers, the grand weave of which corresponds with what’s happening in each moment, Reality as It Is.

It is true, some things that transpire in our lives are the direct expression and playing out of the karma of our soul, whether generated in this life or in previous lives, and there are, indeed, certain movements in our lives that are, in effect predestined from the outset based upon the karmic continuum of our soul. There is, however, the influence and intersection of the karmic continuum of those around us, in family, society, as well as the larger collective of the world, and the influences of the age. Then, with this, there is the influence of hidden, spiritual forces, and our experience is the weave of all of this, and more. If we consider Job, if we account him as a righteous person, and we consider that it is through the sins or negativity of his children that suffering comes upon him, then, in effect, though blameless he endures the sorrow and suffering of his family. This, though, does in effect become ‘his karma,’ for in his relationships and life he has taken this upon himself. Interconnections and interactions like this are going on all of the time between souls, and they are not just a sharing of suffering, but also blessing; hence, these children who enjoyed much feasting due to their father’s merit and work.

There is something to be said of sorrow and suffering. It pervades this life and world, and all realms and worlds of creation, or sentient existence; and this includes realms and worlds of the astral and spiritual dimensions. There is, in truth, no entering into incarnation in this world without experiencing suffering, but in effect, we all have our part of the sorrow and suffering of the world, and rather than being caught up in the question of “why” as Job becomes caught up, the greater question is: What shall we do with the sorrow and suffering that arises in our experience?

The truth is, why this or that is happening is often difficult to determine, but it is what’s happening, for better or for worse, and we need to choose how we respond and relate with what’s happening; specifically, how we might uplift ourselves and what’s happening to God, the True Light.

As we all know, this is easier said than done in the midst of great challenge and suffering at times, and like Job we are likely on occasion to question the Holy One and why suffering exists; for a time we may even fall severely, and may seem to loose faith altogether and turn away from the Holy One. This is how we expand and grow in faith, though, and through it we are able to shed misconceptions, false ideas and vital sentiments concerning God, and may become able to look and see, and listen and hear, God as God Is, and understanding that God is inseparable from Reality as It Is.

If we look at the exchange between God and Job there is a radical revelation of mysteries of creation and God in it, and if we look into it, when all is said and done Job is uplifted and exalted by the Spirit of God all the more – he experiences significant progress in the Life Divine.

If we consider Job’s questions, it seems one moral of the story is that we are wise to be open and honest with God, and to speak with God as with a dear friend, and take everything to God in prayer, daring to ask bold questions. It is this that invokes bold answers, greater insights and illumination, and greater spiritual influxes, greater blessings.

There are many layers of interpretation of such scriptures, many levels of meaning and wisdom, and this is one that stood out to me as I entertained this contemplation over the past couple of days, so I thought I’d share it.

Shalom Aleichem!
Tau Malachi
Sophia Fellowship
Ecclesia Pistis Sophia

Mos_Feo_Appareo

Re: The Book of Job..... the not so innocent.

#4 Postby Mos_Feo_Appareo » Fri Oct 10, 2014 7:08 pm

I thank you both for the very thoughtful replies and likewise, Blessings to you!

You have given me much to contemplate and I wish to absorb it in, as a few comments/questions come to mind. I am going to intentionally omit commentary on Jobs friends for now and keep it within the context of Satan and Jobs "Roles" in this documdrama.
Like Psalm 88, I do believe the true intent of this Book appears when one is in the midst of extreme Spiritual and /or Physical anguish that is not seen by the normal or casual reading.
I will reedit this posting once I organize my reply.

Thank you for this magnificent contemplation I will have whilst cleaning a bit on my Sabbath Day!

sheryl
Site Admin
Posts: 889
Joined: Sat Feb 14, 2004 11:56 am
Location: Grass Valley, CA
Contact:

Re: The Book of Job..... the not so innocent.

#5 Postby sheryl » Sun Oct 19, 2014 5:40 pm

Shabbat Shalom, Dear Tau and Friends,

While posing questions in contemplation today, it came to mind that they were addressed in your reply here regarding Job. The question arose as I realized that even though this life has seen much suffering, my reply to why suffering exists, or why does a merciful, compassionate God allow suffering is still conceptual: suffering exists because of self grasping, false self identification. But I think we are being asked a deeper question by Tau: why has creation been designed with a need for suffering? If we suffer because of self grasping, or self identification, there has to be a reason for this.

What keeps tickling my thoughts this day is that the reason is related to Amen and Aman. If there is going to be a new weave, a new creation, the old threads must first be unwoven. Tau Malachi speaks above of karma being deeper, even originating deeper, with choices sentient beings are making in the inner realms. He also speaks of expanding and growing in faith because of suffering. I am wondering if suffering, like belief and faith, is an energy that matches and invokes something of God into the karmic matrix?

The two sides of cleaving comes to mind - belief and faith joining, suffering separating. Perhaps we are speaking of the same energy that appears oppositional in duality?

I think I will pause, to see if anyone has corrections or additions to these thoughts.

With gratitude,

Sheryl

Tau Malachi
Site Admin
Posts: 5738
Joined: Wed Oct 22, 2003 4:20 pm
Location: Grass Valley, Ca.

Re: The Book of Job..... the not so innocent.

#6 Postby Tau Malachi » Wed Oct 22, 2014 2:58 pm

Grace and peace to you in Hayyah Yeshua!

If you consider it, suffering is what causes us to seek enlightenment or to return God, and to the extent that suffering leads us to return to God, or leads us to invoke God and cleave to God, so through suffering God enters into the great matrix of creation. If we embrace the suffering that arises in our experience, through it we will deepen our faith, increase our knowledge, expand our love and draw nearer to God; of course, suffering can also lead souls in the ‘opposite direction,’ in a manner of speaking, if and when souls enter into a vital reaction to suffering and relate with it in a negative way.

What suffering is, like many things, all depends upon how we relate with it and what we do with it. It is an integral part of life and creation, so one way or the other we will all encounter it; as spiritual Christians it is our aim to use suffering to refine our soul, and to uplift our soul, along with the souls of others, in return to God.

Shalom Aleichem!
Tau Malachi

Sophia Fellowship

Ecclesia Pistis Sophia

Yonah
Posts: 460
Age: 56
Joined: Mon Oct 16, 2006 2:39 am
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Contact:

Re: The Book of Job..... the not so innocent.

#7 Postby Yonah » Wed Oct 22, 2014 5:16 pm

Greetings and Blessings!

Thank you so much for this reminder. This discussion of suffering and how we view it reminds me of the entire discussion on Severity. When we see Severity as punishment then it becomes negative and the restriction is taken to bind, but when we see Severity of God in its true light it actually becomes Mercy.

In his recent trip to Austin, Elder Gideon said that we rewrite our past as we move into our future. This is so true and exactly what is being spoken of in this view of suffering and also severity. If we look back at our past and reframe it based on the mercy that has come out of it, we can actually see the good that has come and let go of the judgment and see that it is really much more.

In the account of Job, characters in the story tell him to curse God and get it over with because he has obviously done something bad. We know from the account that Job is actually considered a righteous man. So, there was no judgment in what happens to him.

The question for us, I think, is can we see that suffering and severity in our life isn’t punishment, but what’s happening? If we can, even difficult times can be reframed into the fire that refines instead of consumes.

It seems that this is related to “going to the cross”? I believe it’s about using what’s happening for the good of all and finding our enlightenment and liberation through it?

Aleichem Shalom!
Yonah
Shalom,
Yonah
EPS Columbus Gathering

Elder Gideon
Site Admin
Posts: 1394
Joined: Mon May 10, 2004 8:41 am

Apocalypse of Job

#8 Postby Elder Gideon » Sat Oct 25, 2014 12:34 pm

Shalom!

I'm very grateful for the many places you've all taken this most mysterious book of Job.

Elder Sarah shared some insights some months ago during her intensive study of it which I'm still contemplating. Essentially, the suffering described in this text is but the platform for a much larger subject, as large as God's Self: Transcendence. As she spoke in this vein, I heard for the first time that this text indeed is about another reality transcendent of suffering altogether, accessed only through suffering. Since this, I've heard and continue to hear another question even more essential than "Why do good people suffer?" Rather than suffering, the greater question in this text is the fundamental assumption of the self that blurs where its projection ends and Reality-As-It-Is begins.

To enter this question from another angle requires recalling the four levels of biblical exegesis-interpretation made into an acronym from the word Garden or Orchard: PaRDeS.

P: P'shat: The plain, direct, face-value meaning of the text.
R: Remez: The hint, suggestion, or implication behind the meaning of the text.
D: D'rash: The midrash, or new teaching integrating the plain and implied meanings of the text.
S: Sod: The esoteric or most mystical meaning of the text.

What this has to do with the Book of Job is everything. This thread began with dimensions of its plain meaning. Beloved companions unfolded this all the way to its implied and midrashic meaning. Tau's weaving and synthesizing companions' comments position us to ask of its secret meaning. Like the Secret Sanctuary of the Body of Truth, Glory, and Emanation, the secret meaning is what can't be told to another. What must be experienced directly for oneself is always beyond the most precise words.

This said, of what can't be said, the climax of this text exposes the deepest, most inevitable disclosure of self as empty, un-inherent. Job's conception of god is his self's projection, a little-g god. He walked with, and prayed to, a little-g god with whom he became angry; his anger betrayed his self projected upon god. This experience is inevitable: Good people project themselves upon god and become angry when their god is contradicted by Reality-As-It-Is. When one's ever so fortunate enough to suffer and be completely disappointed and betrayed by their god, then, like Job, what's exposed is their conception of god. What silences Job's anger with god is what silences our own anger with god: Reality-As-It-Is.

If I pray to something for something, at first it is my ego to whom I'm praying. When what I've prayed for and received is taken away, it is my ego that will be angered by anything suffering contradicts. This is the most basic experience of our beginning as sentient, physical beings. Beneath the most complex and intricate schemata of religious belief systems is our earliest, neolithic animism: Do this and life will be with you. Don't and life will be against you. This pattern remains largely unchanged to this day. Through contradiction and suffering, the Book of Job asks me where my ego ends and God begins.

The demand of this question is answered by its climactic revelation, its apocalypse. When we remember that apocalypse means a disclosure of what is secret, and how biblical interpretation at its most mystical and experiential level is likewise called secret, then I'm hearing that the Book of Job is an apocalypse. We may certainly contemplate God's questions to Job, Where were you when..., not as the words by which its narrative unfolds, but as enveloping visions. Overwhelming, transfiguring apocalypses such as this may be contemplated in Enoch's ascent, the fullness of the Living Yeshua disclosed to his disciples in Pistis Sophia, and the destruction and recreation of earth and heaven in St. John's Apocalypse, which all imply (remez) and convey teachings (d'rash) of the secret (sod) awareness of how a self arises from nothingness, how immanence emerges from transcendence.

I praise the Most High for revealing this as we join with the Blessed Dead this season, many of whom are as angry with their conception of god as the living. May the Most High's final words to Job release us all, living and dead, from misunderstanding Reality-As-It-Is.

Elder Gideon

sheryl
Site Admin
Posts: 889
Joined: Sat Feb 14, 2004 11:56 am
Location: Grass Valley, CA
Contact:

Re: The Book of Job

#9 Postby sheryl » Sun Oct 26, 2014 8:45 am

Shabbat Shalom, Elder Gideon and Dear Friends!

This is a lovely Shabbat Day contemplation as we abide in glimpses of the World-That-Is-Coming, letting go of what has arisen to prepare for what will arise. Praise to the Queen of Shabbat for all of your insightful sharings.

Something my son shared added to contemplations on suffering. In observing those around him in a similar situation - being part of a large layoff from a key employer, he noticed that what is arising for them and for himself is different. He equated it to "emotional intelligence" that is acquired through intense suffering. The evidence of this intelligence is, one, not targeting in on a single outcome, but using more of an expansive labor for job searching, to see what arises, what potentials arise. Another evidence is being able to put your all into this expansiveness, without expecting a certain outcome. And another is being able to communicate with the potentials arising, focusing in on them and who they are, instead your self and your own need or desire. What I heard him saying is that the difference is complete and total focus, and effort without attachment or aversion.

And then while reading your post, Elder Gideon, the thought arose with your words that there is a difference between praying to God for something and co-laboring with God for his Will to manifest, though on the surface these two actions might appear the same. The difference can be seen in something my son is seeing, something that has taken me many years to even glimpse at, which points to my real question in all of this, which I now believe is being addressed in the story of Job:

How can we labor, singularly focused for something, unless we passionately desire it - desire a certain outcome? And how can we passionately desire a certain outcome without being disappointed when that outcome does not come about?

So how can we co-labor with passion, yet without attachments and aversions? In my own experience, this has been a huge learning, and so this day I am seeing something new in the story of Job. Job labored daily for his family, praying and offering sacrifices for them, with what appears to be a desire for them to have life abundant. And then they died. Did he fail? It seems he and his friends thought he did. But what if the point was the labor and not the outcome? What if that part of Job that was there with God in the beginning, compelled him into these daily practices for reasons unknown to him? Perhaps he thought he was doing them for a certain outcome, and then when that outcome did not occur, suffering arose?

If we labor raising our kids, and they die before maturity, did we fail? If we labor with all our focus and energy for a job, and it does not come about, did we fail? If we labor to sell our house and it does not sell, have we failed?

Above, Tau Malachi taught saying:

If we look at the exchange between God and Job there is a radical revelation of mysteries of creation and God in it, and if we look into it, when all is said and done Job is uplifted and exalted by the Spirit of God all the more – he experiences significant progress in the Life Divine.


What I am hearing in this thread is that through our suffering, more of God can be invoked into this world, but the question I would like to pose here is this: Is it the suffering that invokes or is it the focused energy? When we suffer, we tend to be singularly focused - all our energy focused passionately on one desire - bringing an end to suffering. Can we say the same for what appears in duality to be the opposite of suffering: to passionately, with joy, labor in this world?

I am wondering if passionate suffering and passionate joy are the same in a non-dual Gnostic awareness - both being intense, focused labor, both invoking something of God into these realms? And so it is not the outcome of our labor, but the how of our labor that is important? Laboring towards a certain outcome with joy in the labor itself?

This brings to mind that the success in our teachings on Perfect Success is in our laboring, learning to labor with passion, with intense focus, without attachment to our outcomes!

May all beings labor with joy!

With gratitude,

Sheryl

staroath
Posts: 115
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 2009 6:20 am
Location: FL

The Dance

#10 Postby staroath » Thu Oct 30, 2014 10:33 am

Shalom dear Sister,
You pose some interesting questions.

Reflecting on the teachings from recent discourses and such, it seem what is being pointed to is the DANCE we engage in this life with what is before us, the beauty and the horror and seeing how these two are interconnected, all in the experience of knowing the fullness of the One in happiness and in the sadness of our disappointments.

For myself, and it important that you point out Perfect Success, if I have completely and totally and with ongoing zeal consecrated the action to the Holy One, and Mother provides thru experience that this is clearly NOT in the cards right now, then what?

I like to call this a 180 degree turn as Ma wills. It seems part of the spiritual journey is using skillful means learning to navigate these changes in direction, when the answer to our prayer and intention is a clear no and not a yes.

As has been taught when we receive a clear NO to our cherished and consecrated desire, Holy One is pointing us in another direction ultimately for our benefit, and maybe the YES to our desire would have taken us to a place that was not auspicious.

When a loved one loses a job or receives an unfortunate diagnosis or whatever, there are indeed feelings that need to be danced, what can be done?

How can we accept life and all that is given to us, how do we engage this dance?

Ebbs and flows seem never ending, feeling the Presence and not feeling the Presence, such is the beauty of life and the challenge of each day.

What a blessing we have in faith, hope and love, the joy of community, the Sanctuary of Grace in Adonai Yeshua Messiah, let us carry this message forth.

Star

Elder Gideon
Site Admin
Posts: 1394
Joined: Mon May 10, 2004 8:41 am

Yah Doing

#11 Postby Elder Gideon » Sat Nov 01, 2014 10:13 am

Shalom Sisters:

"And then while reading your post, Elder Gideon, the thought arose with your words that there is a difference between praying to God for something and co-laboring with God for his Will to manifest, though on the surface these two actions might appear the same. The difference can be seen in something my son is seeing, something that has taken me many years to even glimpse at, which points to my real question in all of this, which I now believe is being addressed in the story of Job."

Your inquiry into prayer-as-action, Sheryl, is very insightful. For myself, as much as possible, I find spoken prayers are but the beginning, the seeds of action; to pray is to act. While I'm careful not to justify workaholism, I'm wired by design to act a bit (or a lot) more to walking than talking. Remembering that the root to do or make in Hebrew is ahs, עש, the most mystical implication of Asiyah עשיה is that Yah is secretly acting through us—Elohim—in the material plane. In Yah there is no learning, disappointment, or failure, only success. The process by which this reality of Yah realizes itself in material action is by way of Elohim, who personifies the process, scope, sequence, and suffering by which pre-existent success finally touches down to earth through human action: Embodiment.

As Star has echoed, Perfect Success is already so, like Teshuva or Shalom. These principles are primordial and pre-existent. While the fifth step of Perfect Success—Execution—sounds like a final, climactic event, which it certainly in part is, for the gold-medalist or the world-class performer, that flawless fifth step of Execution took hundreds of thousands of fifth steps over years, decades. I hear Execution as the willingness to see what happened through steps one through four again and again. What is being refined throughout this constant reflection and willingness is the first step: Intention. Another word for me of late for Intention is Starting Point, which brings us back to Job not as an inquiry into suffering, but into the Apocalypse of Starting Point.

Within my starting point are layers and layers without end, each of their nuances revealed in what resulted in the execution. Varied results derive from varied nuances of starting point. Revise the starting point and the rest—steps two through five—will follow. It is for this reason that YHVH's revelation to Job of the origin and intention of Creation is the primacy of the text: That we may recognize and realize Elohim through the spiralling process of all that we do reveals Yah having acted all the while: Asiyah: עשיה.

May I remember that it is not I but Messiah within me that does.

Elder Gideon

sheryl
Site Admin
Posts: 889
Joined: Sat Feb 14, 2004 11:56 am
Location: Grass Valley, CA
Contact:

Re: The Book of Job

#12 Postby sheryl » Sun Nov 02, 2014 7:17 pm

Shabbat Shalom, dear Friends!

Thank you for sharing all of these delightful insights!

While reading what you shared, Star, a thought arose that hung around for a few days. This same thought arose again while reading Elder Gideon's teaching.

We learn within the lineage directions in association with the Sacred Circle - directions in which the Wind of Yahweh might move, shift and change:

East: Raphael: Healing of God

West: Gavriel: Strength of God

South: Michael: One Who is Like God

North: Uriel: Light of God

But what the nefesh might experience as change, or a shift in directions, may or may not be associated with the Winds of Yahweh. For example, my own life has taken many twists and turns in how I might describe the mundane tasks before me: parenting, preparing a Study House, looking for a job, selling my house and moving. And each new task has felt like a shift in directions only in as much as I was attached to the task itself. In retrospect, a different way of perceiving directions and changes in directions comes to mind, for the Winds of God have blown independently of the arising of these different tasks. The Winds of Healing have blown during all these tasks, for example.

This same thought arose with the idea of Perfect Success. Now we might take up the tenets of Perfect Success through all the tasks before us - first, taking on a view of perfect success, second, looking at our intentions with each task - consecrating the task to the Divine, third, spiritual, mental, vital and physical commitment or complete commitment to the task, fourth, taking on positive energy in thought, word and action, and fifth, perfect performance or execution. But it now seems that as we labor with perfect success, our perception of the labor changes: what is arising in the physical is no longer the task we are taking on, but a vehicle of the Divine Task. The mundane then becomes the vehicle of invocation of the Winds of Yahweh, through all the Winds' shifts and changes of directions. All as God Wills.

And so I wonder if we can say that Perfect Execution is perfect alignment with the changing Winds of Yahweh?

May the WInds of Yahweh blow where they Will to Blow!

With gratitude,

Sheryl

Tau Malachi
Site Admin
Posts: 5738
Joined: Wed Oct 22, 2003 4:20 pm
Location: Grass Valley, Ca.

Re: The Book of Job

#13 Postby Tau Malachi » Tue Nov 04, 2014 9:57 am

Grace and mercy to you in Yeshua Messiah!

Indeed Sheryl, it is not suffering itself that invokes or brings refinement of the soul, nor does suffering itself bring about a state of complete surrender, but the embrace of what’s happening with an open heart and mind in faith. Certainly not, for with many individuals suffering brings greater negativity, anger, resentment, bitterness and the like, and it can lead to greater bondage, just as it could lead to greater freedom. It is all a matter of how we relate and interact with suffering, and what we do with the suffering that arises in our experience. You are right, if we wish suffering can generate an intense focus of the mind and desire, and this becomes a great power of invocation; likewise, if we are willing to open our heart and mind, and embrace the suffering that arises in faith, surrendering to God and offering it up to God, much refinement of the soul may take place, and we may experience greater nearness to God – a deeper communion with God.

It’s true, suffering produces an intense release and focus of thought and desire, and it can be a great power of invocation, setting things into motion. In this regard we may consider the many premature awakenings of the serpent power (kundalini energy) that various people have reported during times of extreme psychological and/or physical trauma. Essentially, in these cases intense, focused thoughts and emotions arise, and a great desire-energy released – a great invoking or manifesting power.

Now personally, I believe we talk about, and focus on, the subject of suffering far too much, and in so doing, instead of uplifting our minds to those things that are above, where Christ abides in union with God, our minds remain in this world, and quite apart from the awareness of the kingdom of God manifest in it. The obsessive focus on suffering, and negativity, corresponds with habitual patterns of thought and emotion, desire and fear – karmic patterns, and needs to be recognized for what it is – the continuation of our bondage to the gilgulim, and the sorrow and suffering that comes with it.

Understand, there is another way for the generation of a great invoking and manifesting force; in fact, if understood and enacted, there are far greater influxes of spiritual powers from above and a far greater awakening and uplifting of the serpent power.

There was a well-known tzaddik who was a perfect example and teacher of this ‘better way.’ Rebbe Nachman, blessed be his name and memory. As we know his life was filled with tragedy, the progressive loss of his entire family, and in the end his own succumbing to the same disease at the age of thirty-eight. In the midst of this, modern scholars who study his works and life are fairly certain that the great rebbe suffered from bi-polar disorder (or manic depression). In spite of this, however, while indeed teaching his followers how to face and overcome suffering, or trials and tribulations, he taught and practiced a better way, teaching his followers to focus on the good in themselves, others and life, and to labor to draw out that good, and with this he taught them to cultivate joy regardless of what’s happening in life. Instead of focusing so much on suffering, and such, this is the better way, and yes indeed, in this way a great invoking and manifesting force can and will be manifest – not just Simple Mercy, but Abundant Mercy.

This, of course, is not to suggest ignoring or denying suffering, but rather, in suffering, as in all things, seeking to find the good, the blessings, and laboring to draw them out.

There is an even better way, which this practice prepares us for, loving God and one another in complete self-abandoned, and cleaving to God, returning to God and uplifting all to God with us; hence, the cultivation of passionate, all consuming love, the climax of which is ‘the inflaming,’ the delight of ecstasy, or divine rapture, in the embrace of the Beloved.

Hitlahavut this ‘inflaming’ or ‘divine rapture’ is called, and it is the greatest release of the energy of the soul, and intense focus of thought and desire, that can happen in our experience; one taste of this, and an aspirant will understand the true passion of the Messiah, and deep mysteries of the resurrection and ascension.

Shalom Aleichem!

P. S. I wrote this in response to an earlier point in the discussion, but it still seemed relevant as the discussion has progressed so I've chosen to post it.
Tau Malachi

Sophia Fellowship

Ecclesia Pistis Sophia


Return to “Mysteries of the Bible & Gnostic Scriptures”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest