Rebekah: Mother of Two Nations

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Rebekah: Mother of Two Nations

#1 Postby Tau Malachi » Fri May 01, 2015 11:54 am

Rebekah: Mother of Two Nations

“The children struggled together within her; and she said, ‘If it is to be this way, why do I live?’ So she went to inquire of the Lord. And the Lord said to her, ‘Two nations are in your womb, and two peoples born of you shall be divided; one shall be stronger than the other, the elder shall serve the younger” (Genesis 25:22-23).

Rebekah is the matriarch of Gevurah, and therefore corresponds with the Shekinah of Gevurah – Severity, or Judgment. As we know, in Beriyah Gevurah is manifest as Kamael, the champion of heaven, and Samael, the adversary, the angel of death. Thus, it is not surprising that Rebekah is the mother of “two nations,” Israel and Edom (Rome); hence, the Holy Sefirot and the children of light, and the klippot and the children of darkness – good and evil, and admixture.

There are many lessons to be drawn from this passage, and it delves into deep esoteric mysteries. First, consider this. The Holy Shekinah encompasses light and darkness, good and evil, and admixture, and she is the source of all that appears, nourishing and sustaining all, including evil; hence, the great conflict of spiritual beings-forces is within her and she is within it.

Understanding this, and understanding Rebekah was a great tzaddik, and understanding tzaddikim are chariots or dwellings of the Shekinah, in some way, on some level, this is true of the holy tzaddik, she or her encompasses light and darkness, good and evil, and admixture, and nourishes and sustains all, and is a source of blessing, laboring to uplift all. Likewise, as we see with Rebekah, incarnating, taking up her role as a holy tzaddik, she engages good and evil, and she descends from her own proper grade and becomes involved in lower grades, in klippot, ultimately overcoming them and uplifting sparks, uplifting souls. This is typical of tzaddikim, for they must descend in order to draw souls in ascent, helping souls overcome klippot, or barriers.

Now, as we know, the outer person is not always aware of the intention of the inner person, the inner tzaddik, and the inmost aspects of the soul, and therefore, although Rebekah was a holy woman and tzaddik, sensing great evil in her womb and experiencing the struggle within her womb, she was perplexed and was deeply troubled. Thus, she went to inquire of the Lord about what was happening with her, and about what would come to pass, and how she inquired is intriguing. On one hand, when she inquired, saying “If it is to be this way, why do I live,” she was asking the Lord why great darkness is being allowed to enter into the world, and inquiring about all of the sorrow and suffering that will be created by it. In this she was also inquiring what sin or error she might have committed to form a link with such darkness or evil. On the other hand, however, we may also interpret her words as a self-offering for the protection of the people and world from evil, and for the relief of suffering; hence, “take my life that this evil might not come to pass.”

All of these interpretations of her inquiry are, in fact, about the people, seeking to guard and guide the people – the spiritual labor of a tzaddik. In the midst of this labor, though, there is a human being like every other human being, and although there is a greater knowledge and intention in the soul and inner person, at times, in the midst of various movements, the outer person is unaware of it and must seek an answer from the Lord. In some way this need to turn to the Lord and inquire is all part and parcel of facilitating the tikkunim of souls and the world, becoming completely immersed and involved in all matters; this corresponds with “taking on the sin of the world.” Among tzaddikim, Rebekah especially knew this, and she engaged in this full force, embodying the Shekinah of Gevurah for the people and world.

These are a few thoughts I’d offer to begin a contemplation of the Matriarch of Gevurah. I’m inclined to pause at this point, though, to wait upon the Mother Spirit.

May you be blessed to realize the virtue of Righteous Judgment! Amen.

Shalom Aleichem!
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Re: Rebekah: Mother of Two Nations

#2 Postby Anna » Tue May 05, 2015 2:59 am

Blessings in the Light!

In reading the scripture passages and Jewish midrashim concerning Rebekah, a picture of an independent-minded and Godly woman emerges. She is young, perhaps only 14, when she leaves her home to become Isaac's bride, according to one story which speaks of her birth at the time of Abraham's attempted sacrifice of his son. It is also said that she is born before the death of Abraham's wife, Sarah, matriarch of Hesed, which speaks of Rebekah as the successor of Sarah.

Rebekah demonstrates the same kind of hospitality as Sarah, for, not only does she give water to Eliezar, Abraham's servant sent to fetch a wife for Isaac, but she also fulfills the sign the servant asked for from God. She offers to water his camels as well. When asked if the servant could spend the night with her family, Rebekah tells him yes, offering fodder and straw for the camels, too.

Apparently Rebekah's family is not of very high moral character, yet this woman is not adversely affected by her environment or family. She lives by God's law in her heart, even before she swiftly embraces the spirituality of her husband. When the servant wishes to leave with Rebekah to return to Isaac, the family stands in the way to delay Rebekah's departure. They call upon her to decide to stay until Isaac himself comes to take her, or to go ahead and travel to her new husband without meeting him first. Immediately she expresses her desire to go with the servant. She trusts in God and sets out for her new life. Like Sarah before her, she goes when God bids her go.

According to midrashim, signs of Sarah's favor with God appeared all of her life: a cloud was seen over her tent; the gates of her tent were always open; her dough was always blessed; and the lamp burned in her tent from one Shabbat eve to the next one. All of these signs stopped at her death, and resumed when Rebekah came to marry Isaac. Indeed, this was a holy woman!

Her willingness to die rather than allow evil to enter the world through her speaks not only of great courage but also of the total surrender to God, her desire for the Will of God to be done, no matter the cost. When she understands that it is God's Will for her to live and bear these twins, she surrenders to her labor for the people. The acceptance of both good and evil coming from her own womb, and willingly raising and loving her children, all the while knowing that much evil would come from Esau.

I am hearing the wisdom of the balance of forces in the world so that the evolution of the Human One can come about. Often, dear Tau, you remind us that it is only through great pressure that a diamond is formed from carbon. And certainly, for Diamond Being to be generated, there must be much growth in the Spirit. Times of great pressure and distress in life often are the times of greatest growth. And we have heard many times that the greater the descent, the more fuel for an ascent of similar magnitude.

Rebekah's life is hard. She remains barren for 20 years, until Isaac prays to God to give them children. The twins are very different from each other.

27 When the boys grew up, Esau was a skilful hunter, a man of the field, while Jacob was a quiet man, living in tents. 28 Isaac loved Esau, because he was fond of game; but Rebekah loved Jacob. (Gen 25)


Esau marries two Hittite women who worship idols. According to Rashi, Isaac's blindness is attributed to the incense that Esau's wives offered to idols in Isaac's home. As the scripture tells us, these women "made life bitter for Isaac and Rebekah."

When Isaac decides to pass his blessing on to Esau, who has already sold his birthright to Jacob for a dish of stew, Rebekah contrives the famous deception so that her blind husband will pass the blessing onto their worthy son instead of their worldly son. When Jacob fears he will receive his father's curse instead, his mother quickly responds that she will bear the curse for her son.
So Jacob obeys his mother and successfully receives his father's blessing, due to Rebekah's discernment of God's Will, her courage, and her ingenuity. This deception is the skillful means through which Isaac's own "blindness" concerning the worthiness of Esau, his favorite son, is overcome so that the blessing passes instead to Jacob, from whom the twelve tribes of Israel will come into being.

I am struck by the passionate and unwavering devotion Rebekah embodies in a life fraught with struggles. The pressures of her life and environment serve to draw out greater service to God to actively co-labor for God's promise of the two nations, one of which will serve the other, just as Esau is destined to serve his younger brother. She did not waver in her faith, in hope or in love. She served her God until the end of her days, no matter how challenging the task, willing to even suffer under a curse if need be.

Her life story serves as inspiration during times of trial, when life seems filled with pressures, when the darkness in the world seems to cast too great a shadow for the Light to shine in it. Yet, as we are often reminded in Lineage, these are the times of great growth and incredible potential for progress.

I pray the Mother will draw deeper insights out in this thread, insights to guide us in these times of much darkness. May we walk as Rebekah did, with abiding faith, as a sign of hope for a world that sorely needs it, and in love.

Shalom!
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Re: Rebekah: Mother of Two Nations

#3 Postby Tau Malachi » Sun May 10, 2015 10:00 am

Greetings and blessings in the Holy Light of the Messiah!

If we look into it Rebekah understands something of the conflict between Jacob and Esau, for let us remember that Laban is her brother, uncle of Jacob, and he was a sorcerer in the lineage that would eventually give rise to Balaam, the one who would battle Moses. Thus, she understood an “evil seed” in family, and the righteous and wicked side by side one another in family. In this, given her life as a matriarch and tzaddik we may draw out a powerful lesson. Our attachment to name and form, and personal history must be overcome, and the past and family history cannot be allowed to dominate our thoughts and actions today, nor determine who we are in our life.

That said, it is interesting that Rebekah sends Jacob to Laban to seek a wife, but of course she did this because Jacob bore the patriarchal blessing and she knew God was with him, and that with God’s help Laban could not overcome Jacob. Thus, she sent him to Laban to acquire a proper shekinah consort, one worthy of becoming the next matriarch, and in this action she was orchestrating a rebalancing of power, for through his interactions with her brother she believed Jacob would find a way of making peace with his brother Esau, learning how to pacify, enrich, subjugate and destroy klippot.

Now, concerning the deception of Isaac, understand that she received the divine authority to engage in this action before the boys were even born – the very passage we began our discussion with conveys divine authority to guard the lineage and succession, and the will of God concerning this was conveyed to her. Thus, she is enacting the will of God, and she is doing what she’s been given authority to do, tending to the rightful heir of the lineage of light transmission, the patriarchal succession.

This she does, even being willing to take upon herself whatever consequences might happen in the world, in the karmic matrix, to honor God’s will; moreover, as a true tzaddik she is willing to take the karma of others upon herself, engaging a full self-offering.

If you consider the way of Rebekah she is a prime example of a holy tzaddik from the “upper left,” the Side of Judgment.

When we see that Rebekah acted with divine authority there is a lesson for us all. First, that we are not to act without divine authority, for to do so is an action in self-will and subject to the law and judgment. When we have a call, and we are given a work or mission, so we will be given divine authority to carry out all of the actions necessary to accomplish our work or mission, and in the process we will do whatever it takes to fulfill the will of the Lord using skillful means and creativity to do so. In this may God help us!

These were a few thoughts I was inclined to add.

Shabbat Shalom!
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Re: Rebekah: Mother of Two Nations

#4 Postby Marion » Fri May 15, 2015 10:01 am

Shalom!

“The children struggled together within her; and she said, ‘If it is to be this way, why do I live?’”

In contemplating this I am struck by how Rebekah’s struggle in this moment is all of our struggle. Because we are all pregnant with the Christ Spirit. Yet forces of the other side are also conceived in us and seek to overtake us at times. I can feel overwhelmed struggling with old patterns and klippot trying to establish new patterns. Sometimes I wonder which child will overtake the other.

This struggle reminds me of Jacob wrestling with the angel of Esau. Because these old patterns or darkness must be subjugated in me. That this has to be done in love. Because indeed, these dark forces that seek my life are my brothers and sisters. Jacob wrestled with the angel of his brother not in fear or hatred but in love.

Prayer can sometimes feel like a wrestling. Sometimes I am at a crossroads, I want to follow God, but I don’t know which way to turn. Or I am praying because I feel the power of the other side overtaking me in anger or fear. So I pray that God heals me, redeems me. The wrestling is having the faith and hope of where I want to go, and the knowledge of that which is preventing the greater revelation.

The image of Rebekah pregnant with these two twins is so beautiful to me because she knows that in order for Esau to not come into the world, she will have to kill herself along with another soul of light-Jacob. So it is with us. We come into these bodies and there are two inclinations in us (often more!). The journey is learning to love Esau alongside Jacob.

I have been contemplating lately how intertwined love and hate are. I realized that you can’t hate somebody until you love them. Hatred is just the result of when my ego doesn’t get what it thinks it wants. Therefore, if I look deeply into hatred, I find love. Then hate is liberated from it’s husk, and is free to be who and what it most truly is Love-Ahavah, related to Achad-One. Because in this, all becomes One, God, self and other. I wonder if that’s what Jacob did when he was wrestling with the angel of his brother?

Blessings to All!
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Re: Rebekah: Mother of Two Nations

#5 Postby Yonah » Mon May 18, 2015 6:59 am

Greetings,
I've been following this thread an contemplating it. Beautiful teachings and insights.

I'm struck by the fact that Rebekah knows what she is birthing and even offers up her own life, but once she knows that this is the movement that must occur she accepts and moves forward. She allows both children to live and thrive. Her action is to enable the one that will bring light into the world, by assisting in his receiving the blessing, but she still allows both to be what they are.

As Tau Malachi so beautifully stated, she engages good and evil as necessary. It takes me to the teaching that both light and dark are necessary in this world for the spiritual evolution of all beings. Rebekah understands this and allows the movement, while she empowers the good.

I know that Esau is associated with Edom and thus makes me ask if Esau is representing Kllippot while Jacob is representing true will and desire? If so, it is interesting to see how Rebekah allows these two children to live, knowing that they both serve, but all the while helping to strengthen the light and bring it to the forefront.

Somehow I feel that both Jacob and Esau both need to manifest so that in the long run Messiah can be born and bring Light to the world.
Shalom, Yonah
Shalom,
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Re: Rebekah: Mother of Two Nations

#6 Postby Tau Malachi » Thu May 21, 2015 10:07 am

Greetings and blessings in the Holy Light of the Messiah!

The Torah teaches us that Esau was born hairy, and likewise that he was a man of the fields and man of the hunt, and he was a very big and strong man – a brut. Jacob, however, is said to be fair and a “tent dweller.” If you consider the description of Esau he sounds like a beast of the field, while Jacob sounds like a thinking, intelligent human being. Indeed, for Esau is meant to represent nefesh behamit, the bestial soul, and Jacob is meant to represent nefesh elokit, the godly soul.

As we know, nefesh behamit, the evil inclination, strives for dominance over nefesh elokit, the good inclination, but the evil inclination must be brought into submission to the good inclination and must serve the good inclination. When this is accomplished it is the full generation of nefesh elokit, and the unification of nefesh with ruach, and in this the influence of neshamah may enter into an incarnation.

This strive, the inner conflict, is present within every human being – all souls born in this world, and therefore you will understand that this struggle between two nations is in the womb of every pregnant woman, every mother-to-be, for there is the potential of great good and great evil in every fertile womb, as well as everything in between.

This struggle exists in all souls, but it’s also true that some souls from their youth tend towards evil, while some tends towards good, and so it was with Esau and Jacob, Esau being a soul new to human incarnation and Jacob being a soul of a very lofty grade destined to be the Messiah in this world. Thus we hear that Jacob was a man who “dwelled in tents.” “Tent” is a cognomen of the Holy Shekinah, and from his youth he dwelled in her, cleaving to the Holy One and abiding in communion with the Shekinah and the angels.

Here it needs to be said that even if a soul is more inclined towards evil from the outset this does not necessarily mean that soul will fall to evil and become a completely wicked person. There is mercy and there is saving grace, and all souls have a range of choices, and there are those who have initially been inclined to vanity and evil in their lives that in the end became saints or tzaddikim, men and women of God.

Understanding this, in effect, we will each wrestle with the angel of Esau, and through the power of God in Christ we will be victorious. Praise God!

If you inquire about the two nations, understand that the faithful and righteous embody influxes of the Holy Sefirot and Malkut – the kingdom of God, but the faithless and wicked embody the influences of the klippot – the Other Side. These are the “two nations,” and with our life we will serve one or the other.

Shalom Aleichem!
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Re: Rebekah: Mother of Two Nations

#7 Postby sheryl » Sat May 23, 2015 11:41 pm

Shabbat Eve Shalom, Tau Malachi and friends!

I have much enjoyed the teachings that have flowed in this thread. Gratitude and praise to our Mother.

Contemplations of these teachings have given rise to an awareness of a great love emanating within and through Rebekah, a Matriarch of Severity, and the lofty soul that incarnated as Jacob. If feels that the presence of the soul of Esau in the womb, representing the evil inclination in humanity, in each of us, was an act of love beyond surface comprehension.

I am wondering of this act of love, of both souls, a simple but profound act, is revealing the love of God for all souls? For in this we seem to find something of a mystery, teaching us about the necessity of the nefesh behamit in the evolution of a soul, and the evolution of the collective human soul. For is not this presence of Esau, the struggle and overcoming of the beast behamit that was Esau, that lead to Jacob becoming an intelligent human being, one who dwelled in the Holy Shekinah?

Any corrections or adjustments will be received gratefully.

Sheryl
Last edited by sheryl on Mon May 25, 2015 2:04 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: Rebekah: Mother of Two Nations

#8 Postby Tau Malachi » Sun May 24, 2015 9:50 am

Grace and peace to you in Hayyah Yeshua!

On one level Esau in the womb with Jacob, and Rebekah and Jacob having to deal with Esau, represents a truth of this world: Here, in this world, one will encounter evil and there is no avoiding it. If we look into the actions of Jacob and Rebekah concerning Esau there is, in fact, an intention for his redemption, an intention that he might return to God (El, Elohim). This, of course, points to another level of Esau being placed in the womb of Rebekah along with Jacob. If we understand that the soul of Rebekah and Jacob were lofty souls, and that they were great tzaddikim, the presence of Esau does, indeed, point to the great love and compassion of tzaddikim who descend from their own proper grade to engage klippot and to help souls overcome klippot, uplifting souls in the Great Ascension. In the midst of this divine action, much Magdalene vowed to do, great tzaddikim may return to incarnation again and again laboring for the redemption of souls, or their enlightenment and liberation.

As we know, angels also take up this labor of the redemption of souls, tzaddikim and maggidim laboring together for the harvest of souls. This is the love and compassion of the Most High (Elyon), for their actions correspond with the will of the Most High (Ratzon Elyon) and bring delight to the Holy One, and the love and compassion of the tzaddikim and maggidim is in, and from, God Most High (El Elyon).

Remember, creation is founded upon Mercy, not Judgment, and Judgment emanates from Mercy and serves Mercy, and Judgment joined to Mercy generates Compassion, the full range of divine actions for the redemption of souls, or the full range of skillful means. Thus, as we know, salvation is universal and eventually all living spirits and souls will be gathered in and reintegrated with the Infinite One, and these divine actions of redemption include outreach to the darkest of evil, along with everything else in creation; hence, there is a reaching deep into the Great Abyss and the Other Side in a labor for the tikkune of the entire creation.

Now, if you consider it, Rebekah dealt severely with Esau, moving in Judgment, ensuring that Jacob, not Esau, received the blessing of the firstborn and became the successor of Isaac in the lineage of light transmission. The manifestation of Judgment is clear in this, but this Judgment is, indeed, the manifestation of Mercy, for as it was Esau was an evildoer, and was generating a lot of negative karma, invoking Strict Judgment. If he had received the blessing from Isaac, under his dominion Jacob would not have survived, the light transmission would have vanished from the face of the earth, and there would have been no generation of Israel – spiritual humanity. Thus, he would have ended in Strict Judgment and his soul would have been sorely encumbered through many future incarnations. Preventing this from happening Rebekah protected him from greater suffering, and with Jacob, opened the way for a swifter return to God, a swifter enlightenment and liberation.

Rebekah, of course, corresponds with the Holy Shekinah of Gevurah, and as we may recall, in the end of days Isaac was blind, and in the midst of his blindness Rebekah guided Isaac to fulfill the will of the Most High, choosing Jacob to succeed in the patriarchal lineage. This speaks to the Mercy of the Shekinah when manifest in Judgment, for she is far seeing, with sight into the distant future and into the entire play of the law (cause and effect), and with the spirits of tzaddikim and maggidim she acts with a vision of the future, the understanding of how the will of the Most high might be fulfilled, shifting the flow of events as needed to bring redemption and complete creation. Thus, what might seem strict and fierce in the present may very well be unimaginable mercy in a future time, a movement of the vision of all from the eternal realm, fulfilling what is seen, heard and felt in the eternal realm – the Supernal Abode.

This is all a matter of love and compassion, and here let us remember that Jacob is the patriarch of Tiferet (Beauty), or Rehamim (Compassion), the central Sefirah of the Tree of Life, the Sefirah of the Messiah.

As we know, the ultimate manifestation of this love and compassion is in the Messiah.

Shabbat Shalom!
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Re: Rebekah: Mother of Two Nations

#9 Postby Marion » Sat Jun 06, 2015 7:09 am

Shalom,

“…the presence of Esau does, indeed, point to the great love and compassion of tzaddikim who descend from their own proper grade to engage klippot and to help souls overcome klippot, uplifting souls in the Great Ascension. In the midst of this divine action, much Magdalene vowed to do, great tzaddikim may return to incarnation again and again laboring for the redemption of souls, or their enlightenment and liberation.”

Tzaddikim returning again and agin is reminding me of how in the gospels the disciples ask Yeshua how many times they should forgive? and he tells them “70 times 7.” In other words, infinite number of times, as many as is required. I can hear the same question here: “How many times do tzaddkim come back to help us? 70 times 7–as many times as required.”

I’m also struck by how Esau was integral to the coming into being of Jacobs soul. It was preceding the meeting of his brother that Jacob wrestles with his angel and overcomes. Thus, mercy and judgement were able to unite in the meeting of the two brothers when they embraced. Intriguing then, that Jacob is the patriarch of Compassion–Tiferet. I’m hearing what Tau taught above that judgement joined to mercy is compassion.

I’m reminded how it is taught that the goal is not to live a life without any difficulty, because it is difficulty that gives a deeper compassion for the suffering of beings. Tau has taught that when we have actually experienced something in this body, our prayers for others experiencing the same or similar circumstances are much greater because of that vital connection. It is this difficulty that is integral to any progress, and it is the moments of descent that facilitate a greater ascent. It seems that the descent or klippot, becomes the fuel for greater spiritual progress. Like the chaff of wheat that is burnt up creating heat.

This brings up something else said above:

“If he (Esau) had received the blessing from Isaac, under his dominion Jacob would not have survived…”

I’m hearing this as the teaching of what we are giving our energy to. Do we give our energy–our blessing to forces of the other side (Esau) or to the Divine (Jacob)? It seems like an important point that if we give our energy to the bestial soul, our divine self cannot indwell, as Yeshua says: “No one can serve two masters, for either they will hate the one and love the other, or they will be devoted to the one and despise the other.”

Blessings and Shalom,
Marion

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Strength

#10 Postby Elder Gideon » Sat Jun 06, 2015 11:31 pm

Shalom!

From Elder Sarah's relating in another post she started called "Awareness of Da'at," the release of forgiveness requires faith that comes from the bigger picture:

The master is giving a beautiful key here, do not doubt and forgive, that the Holy One may forgive you. It becomes very interesting to overlap these ideas and view them together, in this perhaps hearing, our inability to forgive, first ourselves and then others is what causes doubt to occur in mind. In doubt we undermine our own success, perpetuating failure. Really, though, this comes from a place that lacks forgiveness, lacks acceptance of self. Where this begins to go is into a contemplation of how we hold our power back, not allowing the full force of our power to come forward.

When Sister Marion shared from the Gospel how many times Yeshua taught us to forgive, I discovered a beautiful mystery. Seventy ע and seven ז as Hebrew letters actually spell a powerful word that we may deeply contemplate in regards to Mother Rebekah: Oz, עֹז, means every sense of the word strength. It is through the mystery of forgiving ourselves and others that we can dispel draining doubts and be strong in the Presence in more and more difficult circumstances.

As I reflect on everything you've all contributed to a deeper appreciation, strength is key term I hear for this matriarch: But Jacob said to his mother Rebekah, ‘Look, my brother Esau is a hairy man, and I am a man of smooth skin. Perhaps my father will feel me, and I shall seem to be mocking him, and bring a curse on myself and not a blessing.’ His mother said to him, ‘Let your curse be on me, my son; only obey my word, and go, get them for me’ (Genesis 27:11-13). Oz as one of many Hebrew words for this physical, instinctual strength also includes the social and persuasive strength to influence others directly and indirectly, showing up repeatedly in the Psalms. That she is willing absorb any breach or degradation of this intention is most outstanding to me, teaching of an essence of strength.

I'm not only grateful for all you're sharing, but for what more of Mother Rebekah's strength may be gleaned
from the power of forgiveness, which dispels doubts. May the Mother be praised to show us how to be sly as serpents and innocent as doves.

Freedom received by oneself is freedom given to another.
Such a simple Gospel with infinite applications.


Elder Gideon


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