Mother's Womb & Life (Job 1:21)

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Tau Malachi
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Mother's Womb & Life (Job 1:21)

#1 Postby Tau Malachi » Mon Sep 28, 2015 2:42 pm

Mother’s Womb & Life

“Naked I came from my mother’s womb, and naked I shall return there; Yahweh gave, and Yahweh has taken away; blessed be the Name of Yahweh” (Job 1:21).

This passage contains deep esoteric wisdom, and it offers a practical teaching concerning faith and life. Let us consider it and see what wisdom we might glean.

First it is said, “Naked I came from my mother’s womb, and naked I shall return there.” On the surface there is a simple teaching, one that is obvious; hence, the womb and the tomb are one, two side of the gate through which souls enter and exit incarnation, the in-between of the spiritual and material reality. All that is born into this world will die, departing in the same way that it entered, though in reversal, or dissolution. The beginning and end of life are united, and whatever is gathered in this world remains in this world at death, and the vital soul (nefesh) and spirit (ruach) return to their root. What remains in the hereafter is the experience of the life lived, the accomplishments of love and mercy, the knowledge, understanding and wisdom acquired, and whatever has been done to better the world and uplift humanity, or whatever has been done to uplift souls in return to the Holy One; hence, all that expressed and embodied the desire of neshamah, the supernal and heavenly soul - our true being.

There is something more, though, as reflected by what the Torah scholar said to Adonai Yeshua when the Master spoke to him of being reborn of water and the Spirit: “Can one enter a second time into the mother’s womb to be born?” (John 3:4). This verse from Job literally says “…I shall return there.” Read in this way, understanding the truth in the inquiry of Nicodemus, the mother’s womb of which Job is speaking isn’t a physical mother or physical womb, but rather implies a spiritual mother and spiritual womb from which souls emanate as they enter into incarnation, which is reflected in the material world by the physical mother and womb. Here we may say that Job is speaking about God as Mother (Elohim Imma), and is indicating the interior Shekinah, corresponding with Binah. From Binah - the interior Shekinah of Yahweh, souls issue naked, which is to say without a physical body, and from neshamah there is the emanation of ruach and nefesh as conception transpires in this world, and in this way a soul is born and is clothed in a physical body - “coat of skin.” When death occurs and the soul sheds the physical body it returns to that womb of the Holy One, and it is naked, without the flesh. As we know, if life is lived in righteousness and truth, and the soul awakens and becomes enlightened - having been born from above, the soul may experience full reintegration with the Light of the Infinite; but if not, the soul will remain bound up in transmigration, and will be reborn into this world, or another realm or world of Perud - separation.

In regard to a life lived in righteousness and truth, and the enlightenment of the soul, we may recall a saying from Thomas: “When you strip naked without being ashamed and take your clothes and put them under your feet like little children and trample them, then you will see the Sun of the Living One and not be afraid” (37).

Understanding this we may consider the remainder of our verse: “Yahweh gave, and Yahweh has taken away; blessed be the Name of Yahweh.”

This is the proclamation of Job after the loss of his wealth and his children in a time of incredible grief, and as such it is an expression of faith and passionate cleaving to Yahweh in a time of great trouble and challenge. This is life, there are flows and ebbs, gains and losses, good times and hard times, but through all times of life, in joy or sorrow, pleasure or pain, it is imperative that we live according to our faith and knowledge, and cleave to the Lord (Yahweh, Yeshua), blessing The Name (Ha-Shem) and giving praise for salvation - the eventual ascension of the soul and reintegration of the soul with the Lord.

“…But human beings are born to struggle” (Job 5:7). Understand, difficult times and many challenges naturally come in life, and we will face many barriers arising from the flow of life, as well as internal klippot and tikkunim of our soul; to abide in faith during good times, and to live according to our faith and enact righteousness when things are going as we wish is relatively easy, but it is another matter when we face difficult times and challenges, and things are not going as we wish, then it can become hard. During difficult times and in the midst of challenge, however, it is most important for us to keep the faith and live it, enacting righteousness and truth, and blessing The Name. In a manner of speaking, it isn’t the easy times for which we come here and are born, but it is the for difficult times, the times of challenge that we are born here, for these are the experiences through which the soul becomes refined and realized, and make radical leaps of evolution in the Spirit. We are “born to struggle” to overcome barriers and accomplish the tikkunim of our soul - to awaken and become enlightened, and if we abide in our faith, and cleave to the Messiah and Holy One throughout, we will overcome whatever barriers we encounter and be victorious (Israel).

This, exactly, is the wisdom of St. James when he teaches us: “My brothers and sisters, whenever you face trials [barriers] of any kind, consider it nothing but joy, because you know that the testing of your faith produces endurance, and let endurance have its full effect, so that you may be mature and complete, lacking nothing” (James 1:2-4).

What St. James teaches us is this, that when we encounter difficult times, or challenges, it is important that we do not fall into ourselves, and become discouraged and depressed, and lose our faith and hope; and in the face of whatever challenges that arise we need to remember that our hope, our healing and salvation, is not in this world and things of this world, but it is in heaven and the Messiah - the awakening and enlightenment of the soul, and the transcendence of the need for physical incarnation.

Here we may say that joy also corresponds with an open heart and mind, and uplifted energy.

We are wise to live life to its fullest, and to be aware of how precious each and every moment of life is, but as we do it’s important that we do not grasp at this world and things of this world, but rather that we recognize and realize our greater life, our greater being, beyond this body and this world, and more so recognize and realize the source of our life, our being - the Holy One, and seek full reintegration with the Light of the Holy One, the Infinite.

This is the contemplation that has filled my heart today.

May we be empowered to have enduring faith until the end, and in the End-Of-Days may we enter into the World-To-Come, realizing eternal life in the Messiah! Amen.

Shalom Aleichem!
Tau Malachi
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Womb of Beauty

#2 Postby Elder Gideon » Tue Nov 24, 2015 11:10 am

Full Moon Shalom, Tau Malachi:

...when we encounter difficult times, or challenges, it is important that we do not fall into ourselves, and become discouraged and depressed, and lose our faith and hope; and in the face of whatever challenges that arise we need to remember that our hope, our healing and salvation, is not in this world and things of this world, but it is in heaven and the Messiah - the awakening and enlightenment of the soul, and the transcendence of the need for physical incarnation.

I'm very grateful for your drawing out of Job this mystery of our nakedness and dependence upon the One. Just this last Shabbat, I had an opportunity to share what you've taught me of the Mother, that her womb is every physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual context of existence. I'm conceived and grow in a material womb to be born into this much greater planetary womb. What is happening at any point in this world is the Mother. Every context in this world is the Mother.

This everythingness of the mother is present in a Hebrew word for womb rehem רֶחֶם that also means matrix. The same letters pronounced raham not only denote womb, but compassion as well, which in Kabbalah is synonymous with the central sefirah Tiferet: Beauty. We've explored Beauty very deeply in an unrecorded Shabbat discourse, where this word was deconstructed from its connotations with pretty or lovely to open a more essential and piercing sense of this intricate Kabbalistic principle: Beauty is the unspeakable insight arising between the contrast of great love and pain.

Enduring stories, fictional or lived, burn with great Beauty when trapped characters transcend their misery. Misery alone strips one to their foundation, such as Job, whose life is an allegory of anyone stripped of every reference point to confront what's left. From the surface, nothing remains; just behind that same surface, the One remains. Where Job's ego-god ends and the One-Without-End begins, is this text's shrining insight of Beauty.

All the sefirot emanated from Binah are linked to this Beauty. This inspires me to ask of the sefirot in a way I've not heard before, that from Hesed to Malkut, all sefirot are the womb of the Mother. This suggests so much to contemplate. The Grace of her womb, the Judgment of her womb, the Beauty of her womb, the Victory, Splendor, and Foundation of her womb, all seem as concentric uterine-linings that manifest her Sovereignty. What may be added to or corrected in this perspective of all the Sefirot of Construction as the womb of Binah?

Gratefully,

Elder Gideon

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Re: Mother's Womb & Life (Job 1:21)

#3 Postby Marion » Fri Nov 27, 2015 9:02 am

Shalom Tau Malachi and Elder Gideon,

“Yahweh gave, and Yahweh has taken away; blessed be the Name of Yahweh.”

I was contemplating this verse in the context of what Malachi says: “…the awakening and enlightenment of the soul, and the transcendence of the need for physical incarnation.”

In the original verse, I’m hearing a switch in Job’s understanding of where all things emanate and all things return. That is, to this ineffable source of all, as the Sefer Yetzirah says: “Ten sefirot of belimah–without what.” We know that Mah–what, is associated with Binah.

The original verse from Job says the name of Yahweh three times: once in mercy–Yahweh gave, once in severity–Yahweh has taken away and once in compassion–blessed be the name of Yahweh. I’m wondering if we can say that Job is now identified with the source of all things rather than the things themselves? There was a teaching at Shabbat that if we lose hope and faith in the face of challenges or difficult times, we have just created an idol out of the thing that we apparently lost. Putting that idol before God and giving our power to it. If my starting point is myself, when I don’t get what I want, then God is against me. If my starting point is God and i don’t get what i want, I know it’s all leading to salvation.

I wonder if there's a teaching of the womb of the mother in this? We're told "The Mother shows you the face of your Father." So if we're identified with this womb, this no-thingness from which all things arise, is it then possible to see the face of the Father if one is identified with the no-thingness of the Mother? I'm reminded of how Malachi has taught that the experience of no-thingness is the womb that gives birth to the experience of Supernal consciousness.

This teaching you’re drawing out Gideon is very beautiful: “Beauty is the unspeakable insight arising between the contrast of great love and pain.” Understanding that in Jewish Kabbalah, Yahweh is associated with Tiferet–beauty. Therefore, I’m enjoying a contemplation of an alternative reading of the original verse: Beauty gave, and beauty has taken away; blessed be the name of beauty.”

There is another teaching in this; if I am able to receive great love and great pain as beauty, then perhaps I can receive the great love and great pain of others as beauty. If encountering a negative situation, or even interacting with an evil doer, can I see beyond the moment and see these beings as they are in God? An evil doer will not always be evil and when people hurt us, that is not the entirety of who they are. It’s just a little blip in the radar, a small pinhead of their entire existence. This is good news, because it means that when we act in an evil way, we don’t have to identify with it. I’ve been wondering if evil doers are evil doers because they believe they are evil? They don’t believe in that spark of goodness within themselves and so do not see it in anyone else either?

In this, I’m reminded of something we’re taught in the Zohar: “Always interpret dreams positively.” If we view ourselves as beauty and view everything happening in life as beauty, then that is what will manifest. So the question becomes: What do we want to manifest? What experience do we want to have? And what God are we praying to with our intentions, thoughts and actions?

Blessings and Shalom,
Marion

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Re: Mother's Womb & Life (Job 1:21)

#4 Postby sheryl » Fri Nov 27, 2015 10:55 am

Shalom Tau Malachi, Elder Gideon, Marion and Friends!

I am delighting in the teachings given and what has been shared! Much gratitude to the Giver of All.

Thoughts began swirling when looking at something Gideon shared about:..a Hebrew word for womb rehem רֶחֶם that also means matrix. The same letters pronounced raham not only denote womb, but compassion as well, which in Kabbalah is synonymous with the central sefirah Tiferet: Beauty.

In searching, it was found that rehem רֶחֶם, is used as 'womb' but only a few times, and is said to mean: the seat of emotion of the mind and used as womb when speaking of the space made within the heart and minds for the arising of a baby, a space of compassion and love made within both parents. This is causing me to look at the Womb of the Mother in a new way. An experience had this morning has added to this new insight.

Since the cold and rain has moved in, my dogs have felt challenged to go outside to do their business, so I have been taking them out, going out with them when possible, to facilitate correction. This morning while with them outside, it came to mind that I was creating a space for them, one filled with love, drawing them into this space, in which they could do their business. And there, in that space, by their own cooperation and alignment, they were able to join with me and receive reward and delight. I am wondering, then, when rehem is translated as womb does it mean something more than womb? Perhaps Gideon has stumbled onto a hidden teaching in scripture on cleft?

Tau Malachi, you taught saying:

In this process, naturally, we need to cultivate the Divine Attributes (Sefirot) in us, and we need to learn how to cleave and unify our soul with the Divine Attributes of the Pillar of Compassion, and how to reach into Mercy and Severity, and into Imma, the interior Shekinah beyond. Our Tzaddik will help facilitate our ascent from grade to grade, and will labor to uplift us, but we must co-labor with them and seek to work out our own salvation, all as Yeshua Messiah has called us to do.


If I am understanding what is being taught about cleft properly, and its association with Da'at, I wondering if we can say that Da'at is the space created in the Womb of the Mother, and the Beauty and Compassion of Tiferet, is how we join in that space, thus cleft is the Messiah, and is pointing to the Wedding Chamber? Tzaddik, then, being the embodiment of the Messiah, is the mediator, the facilitator of the uplifting of our soul into the cleft of the Mother?

Tau Malachi, you also said something else that is intriguing:

Now this running and returning of the soul the soul from Malkut to Binah can occur on many different levels; hence, it can happen at the level of Asiyah, Yetzirah, Beriyah, Atzilut or Adam Kadmon, and then it can happen within the Holy Partzufim, the interiors of the Sefirot of Atzilut.


Can we say that the interiors of the Sefirot of Atzilut - that are within the Holy Partzufim - are the cleft, the space created for us within Mother?

May the swirling of these thoughts bring beauty and fruition!

With gratitude,

Sheryl

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Re: Mother's Womb & Life (Job 1:21)

#5 Postby sheryl » Fri Nov 27, 2015 11:31 am

Shalom Dear Friends!

This contemplation keeps growing! Praise Imma!

As we move towards the Feast of Mother and Child, another thought arises.

In the biblical story of the birth of Yeshua, it is said that in this world there was no room in the Inn for Mother Miriam and Joseph, so thoughts arose that Mother God made room, represented by the cave, where what has become known as the manger scene unfolded.

Can we say that this room is associated with the cleft of the Mother?

And then can we say that the cleft of the Mother becomes the space made for the birth of Christ? Associated with the birth canal in physicality? It then comes to mind that the Wedding Chamber is more associated with the birth of the Christ Child within, and its ascension, rather than with conception?

With gratitude,

Sheryl

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Re: Mother's Womb & Life (Job 1:21)

#6 Postby Tau Malachi » Sat Nov 28, 2015 9:39 am

Grace and peace to you in Hayyah Yeshua!

Binah is called Mi, “who,” while Malkut is called Mah, “what.” You may recall the passage, “Who created these” and the discussion of the rabbis in the Zohar concerning it, “who” being attributed to Binah and “these” to the Sefirot of Construction, for the Sefirot of Construction emanate from Binah, and she creates, forms and makes them, giving rise to the Realm of Perud emerging from the Realm of Yichud.

If we consider it, the Sefirot of Construction of Atzilut are like the Mother’s womb, for from them the Sefirot of Beriyah, Yetzirah and Asiyah emerge, the Realm of Perud; as we know, Binah, Imma, is the root of Beriyah, and the word Beriyah implies separation and individuation, as in giving birth.

Binah is called “heart” and “womb,” the heart-womb of the Mother, and while emanating, giving birth, all emerging from within her heart-womb, at the same time all remains in her heart-womb, she holds all in her heart womb. In this regard we may recall Mother Miriam, the partzuf below of Mother, Imma, and what is said of her, that she treasured the events and mysteries of the Gospel, the life of the Son, in her heart, holding him in her heart.

Binah is Mi, “who,” and Malkut is Mah, “what,” and these correspond with the interior and exterior Shekinah, or the upper and lower Shekinah; but understand that the Mother, Imma, and Daughter, Nukva, are one, and are inseparable from one another, and in fruition the Daughter becomes the Mother, creation, as it were, returning to the Holy Mother awakened, realized. In a manner of speaking, “who” is awakened in “what,” and in this awakening souls realize their innate unity with the Holy One, that they live and move and have their being in the Holy One, and are the emanation of the Holy One, never having been separate from the Infinite.

The Holy One immanent, the Holy One within and all around us, is the Mother, and we do indeed live and move and have our being in her; she is the Great Matrix surrounding us and manifesting as us, material, astral, spiritual and supernal, all rooted in the primordial. In a manner of speaking, the Great Matrix is her body, and garments, and at the same time we may say that the Great Matrix is her womb birthing souls to eternity, the World-That-Is-Coming.

If we consider the Tree of Life as concentric circles, the upper Sefirot containing the lower, then, indeed, there may be an intriguing contemplation of the Mother’s womb and our being held in it; but then there is the reverse pattern, the upper Sefirot being within the lower, there is the contemplation of all as the radiance of the Mother, emerging from the Mother. All in a great mystery, these are simultaneous truths of Reality as It Is and the Great Mother, Gadol Imma.

Here we may say that the manifestation of reality moment to moment in apparent Mercy, Severity and Compassion is the dance of the Holy Shekinah, and all that appears is in the in the Mother and emanates from the Mother; understanding this in everything we may behold the Mother, and we may receive all that transpires as the manifestation of the Mother.

Shalom Aleichem!
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