Quest. about God

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Kelly Ann
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Quest. about God

#1 Postby Kelly Ann » Fri Dec 21, 2018 8:36 am

Greetings and Blessing in the name of the Holy One and hello to my new friends in the Pistus Sophia community:

My name is Kelly Ann. I am a spiritual aspirant and student of gnosticism. having discovered the gnostic gospels a couple of years ago. I have become passionate in my study of the Nag Hammadi library, so deeply and utterly touched by the underlying message contained within these gospels, that within each of us resides a divine spark, and that it is our goal in life to access this spark, to enter into this place of divinity, and ultimately to merge withe this God Consciousness within. That it is the purpose of our life to develop our consciousness to the highest degree possible, and, it is this consciousness with whatever degree of soul development we have attained, that will live on after the death of our physical body.

In The Apocrypon of James, found within the first codex of the Nag Hammadi library, Jesus urges James and Peter to "understand what the great Light is," and tells James and Peter that to truly know themselves in this way is to know God, or one's inner divinity, and is to have a direct pathway to God, without the mediation of others. Jesus reminds them that to know oneself, at the very deepest level, is to know God. Tau also writes of this, of union with God consciousness, of how we will find God within our inner being, and, from doing so, that we are to then follow this Light and this guidance which we have received. That this then becomes the foundation for our faith.

The personal path to Christhood that each of us walks is a path of inner discovery and learning, of opening to the insights and revelations that are given to us as we touch this divinity within. Each of us comes to this path when our souls are ready, and not before. Here, in the Apocryphon of James, Jesus tells both James and Peter that they are to rely on, and listen to, their inner wisdom. And, so, we understand that it is our responsibility to cultivate a level of self-governance within as as we learn to walk, and honor, this personal path of Christhood.

In The Treatise on the Resurrection, also found within the first codex of the Nag Hammadi library, it is emphasized that it is our spirit that is our true and essential nature, and that we came into this world as a spirit to adopt physical form: "you received flesh when you entered this world." The author of this text affirms that it is realization of this knowledge of the eternal nature of our indwelling spirit that is our purpose while in physical form, that coming to this knowledge, in essence, becomes our spiritual resurrection. With the departure from physical life, he explains, we do not give up our best aspect.

And so, it is with all of you, that I celebrate, and honor, this path. Deeply grateful to have found a community where I may share myself openly. And, where I may continue to embark on this path of spiritual evolution. I have ordered two of the books from your reading list, St. Mary Magdalene: the Gnostic Tradition by Tai Malachi and The Gospel of Mary Magdalene by Jean Yves Leloup. And, am highly excited to begin studying them both.

May the Holy One offer blessings to you all on this day.

With love,
Kelly Ann

Elder Gideon
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Our Jewish Roots

#2 Postby Elder Gideon » Sat Dec 22, 2018 9:56 am

Shalom Kelly Ann and welcome to our community!

I moved your post here to our welcome and introductions page so that others would easily find and greet you as well. I enjoyed reading the clarity of your voice and story of the One awakening a deeper, mystical need within your soul.

I marvel how the Spirit brings people to the mystical path. You'll find here that you're in good company. Most all of us have come from some kind of orthodox or fundamental beginnings that, while introducing us to spiritual principles, could no longer satisfy the needs for which our soul was longing.

What I embrace of the Nag Hammadi is its evidence of diverse views and experiences with the Messiah than those standardized and homogenized by orthodoxy. I believe we cannot hear the gospel for its immediacy and non-duality apart from this Gnostic evidence. Adonai Yeshua clearly essentialized and reformed Jewish mysticism in his day. He taught how we can all remember and realize the One with us, here and now, that there was no need for ritual or temple or any other barrier to a conscious union with the One. Yet another law-giving orthodoxy in his name swiftly arose and reverted everything back to doctrines of separation between the One and humanity religious authorities alone could mediate. Orthodoxy all but suppressed teachings of non-dual, Gnostic salvation, which the Nag Hammadi texts prove.

Our lineage does not use everything of the library, because it's just that—a library. The variety of texts are from a variety of schools, not all of which we resonate with. We veer away from the dualistic texts that indict matter and the body. While we acknowledge the metaphysics of the Demiurge, we absolutely reject any schools' claims that this is YHVH; instead, we frame the Demiurge and archons with Kabbalistic language, as our lineage teaches from the Kabbalistic tradition. We read and deconstruct the Jewish Kabbalah through a Christian lens. This was and continues to be our work and outreach: to preach a Christian Kabbalah.

Gnostic Christian texts that we appropriate are those of the Valentinian tradition (Gospel of Phillip, Gospel of Truth) and Thomas often. Notwithstanding the fragmentary state of the Gospel of Mary, our lineage embraces Magdalene's voice and authority: She is Christ the Sophia, Apostle of the apostles. Outside of Nag Hammadi, we also consult the first four books of Pistis Sophia, where again, Magdalene dominates with the most insightful questions. Because the communities that generated these texts are extinct, we even read these gospels through a Kabbalistic lens.

Our insistence on Kabbalah is for all it still has to say of the Messiah and Shekinah, now and in the World-to-Come. The integrity of this tradition preceded Christianity and endured its persecution precisely while rabbis generated some of the holiest, most refreshing revelations of the coming Messiah. It's ironic and amazing that there's still much more to learn about God's Messiah from mystical Jews than from most of the church fathers. This is why we're more grounded in the Jewish roots of mystical Christianity. The language and model of consciousness from Kabbalah is the most integral and sophisticated in all of the West.

I hope this all gives some useful background to what you're feeling in our forum. There's nothing like ours for free in the web. If I can help in any way point you to what you'd like to read and study further, don't hesitate to ask. To meet more of us, consider registering here if you'd like to meet other practitioners in our community. Our Shabbat meetings are also broadcast in YouTube: simply search Ecclesia Pistis Sophia. Consider following us in Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter, and you'll see people interacting with posted contemplations daily. 

Please stay in touch! We'd love to meet you more!

Shalom Sister!

Elder Gideon

Kelly Ann
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Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2018 3:31 am

Re: Quest. about God

#3 Postby Kelly Ann » Mon Dec 24, 2018 12:34 pm

Shalom Brother Gideon,

I thank you for your response to my entry, and so appreciated your summary of the Jewish roots of your Sophian gnostic lineage. I do resonate with the teachings of your lineage. And, throughout my study of the Nag Hammadi library over the past couple of years, I also have come to discover that it is the Valentian school of thought that my spiritual principles most resonate with.

Of course I cherish the Gospel of Thomas (who wouldn't?), but one of my favorite gnostic gospels, undoubtedly, is the Gospel of Philip. I understand the overriding theme within Philip's letter is in emphasizing the difference between those who understand the Truth (the secret teachings of Jesus), and those who do not. Philip cites those who understand and have arrived at gnosis as the ones who have developed true maturity in consciousness. They are the ones, he asserts, who have received the Light, "If we are joined to it, it will bring our fulfillment."

I am aware, as I read and reread Philip's message within this gospel, and as I deepen my understanding of my own interior process, that I am filled with a deeper sense of honor and reverence for this journey. I find myself rededicating my path to this process of inner knowing, understanding that the deeper I am able to know myself, the deeper I then know God. And, recognizing that the more I am able to access this place of divine inspiration and revelation, the more I will be changed, the more I will be capable of dwelling in Love. I do know that when I am walk out into the world possessing this deep level of maturity within my consciousness, that this is how I impact the world most profoundly. Reflecting the highest level of love, grace and compassion for all.

Philip declares that all that we learn as a consciousness must be gained during our physical incarnations, that it is our physical existence which allows us opportunity for growth, not after we have left the body. This is a theme which is also reinforced in the Treatise on the Resurrection. Philip's statement reminds us of the deep significance of our journey, of the value to be held in aspiring to know ourselves at our deepest level." We know the work we do while in physical form to be of the utmost importance.

Goethe once wrote that we are shaped and fashioned by what we love. I do agree.

I am deeply grateful to have found a group whose spiritual ideals are so aligned with my own (it has been lonely). And, look forward to much inner growth through being in relationship with you all.

With love,
Kelly Ann

Kelly Ann
Posts: 9
Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2018 3:31 am

Re: Quest. about God

#4 Postby Kelly Ann » Tue Dec 25, 2018 4:51 am

Merry Christmas fellow aspirants!

The Apostle Philip wrote that "the cup of prayer contains wine and water," which I take to mean that our offering ourselves in prayer can be an experience which allows us to move deeply into our inner divinity, that sacred space within the heart where the Holy Spirit resides. This is the space where we touch and enter into Love, and where our heart opens in fullness through the process. We still our mind, moving into the sacred space within, feeling the opening our heart, and giving thanks, without words, for the abundance and blessings of our life.

Christmas, for me, is a day of prayerful thanks. And, as I allow myself to sink into the deeper essence of this day, my heart is moved beyond description. I realize that we are here for such a short time, and that it is those moments of love and kinship with others that we will carry with us when we leave. We each weave experiences for ourselves in this life based on how we see ourselves and the world; we each imprint the world around us in our own unique manner. And, we each have our own lessons to learn as we travel along our path. To learn to touch our inner divinity is the task we are each presented with. And, in doing so, to imprint the world with this essence of our heart, with the fruits of our efforts..

And, so, I offer to all of you my wishes for this day. May you be filled with Love. May your hearts be open. May you experience moments of joy with your loved ones.

There are no accidents. I believe we are each guided to be exactly where we are, and for a reason. Every moment formulated for our learning, and our expansion. Every relationship, with its intermingling of energies, has its reason and purpose.

Philip also wrote that what we see we become. And, this for me, is a powerful idea. Similar to Goethe's message, "we are shaped and fashioned by what we love," or the message of Annie Besant when she declared, "have then your Ideal, and think of it every morning for a few moments, and it will gradually transform you into its own image; as in the glass you see your image reproduced, that Ideal in the mirror of your mind shall reproduce itself." We mold in ourselves an essence that is created from the ideals that we focus on and attend to. Those ideals influence the decisions we make, the thoughts we think, and the experiences we partake in. Which means that every passionate, joyful or serene moment impresses itself upon ourselves, and stamps our heart in a very special way. And it is this essence, this state of consciousness, that we take with us at the end of our soujourn here on Earth. I do believe that, while here in physical form, it is our responsibility to evolve in consciousness to the best of our ability.

Shalom!

Kelly Ann

Tau Malachi
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Re: Quest. about God

#5 Postby Tau Malachi » Tue Dec 25, 2018 11:28 am

Blessings to you in the Holy Light of the Messiah!

The layers of mysteries and teachings we find in the gospels has no end, and new teachings and revelations continually arise from the Holy Spirit as we study and contemplate them over the years and continue to walk with God and in God, and deepen our inwardness, our communion with Christ and God.

When I consider the ‘cup’ and the ‘wine’ and ‘water,’ bearing in mind the tradition the tale of blood and water pouring from the side of Adonai Yeshua’s body when pierced with a spear, and the legend of the Magdalene catching something of that issuance in a ‘cup’ - the grail which is herself as the Apostle of Apostles, I find in the ‘cup of wine and water’ the play of initiation, or ‘Light Transmission,’ through which the Word and Holy Spirit are awakened in us, or the Word is conceived and birthed in our soul through the Holy Spirit - Mother Spirit. As much as the Christ-Spirit is, indeed, within all people, and the inmost part of the soul of all people is inseparable from its source, God Most High, unless there is a reception of the Holy Light and Spirit from above - rebirth from above, it is like a dormant, latent potential, not actualized and realized, and so truly embodied. In the gnostic apostolic succession, represented by the ‘cup,’ the Holy Bride, there is the play of Light Transmission, the communication of the Living Word and Spirit, and so the awakening of souls in Christ. So this ‘wine,’ the Holy Spirit, and this ‘water,’ the Word, is what Christ Is, and what Christ brings and gives, awakening that very Christ-Spirit in us, and in turn this passing of the Holy Light and Spirit continues through Anointed Community - the Living Body of Christ, and the play of the ‘gnostic apostle’ - those embodying spiritual or supernal realization, knowledge of God through unification, Christ or God Consciousness.

Receiving the Holy Light and Spirit, we are to hold and give it, and indeed as much as the Messiah enacts a complete surrender and self-offering, so also taking up our cross and following in the Way, so also are we to participate in this ‘rite of ransom,’ and in this play of Light Transmission - the Word continuing to become flesh, embodied, with, in and through us, and as us.

The other passage you cite from Phillip interacts directly with this. We could, indeed, take it as a teaching on the power of envisioning and affirmation; but among gnostics, having the experience of Light Transmission - something like the disciples witnessing the Transfiguration of the Master on the sacred mountain, we read: ‘You cannot see anything in the spiritual realm unless you become it,’ and this teaches that what we witness in revelations of the Risen and Ascended Messiah, and in the play of Light Transmission, and various movements of the Holy Spirit in prayer, meditation and sacred ceremony in community, and in our own interior life and continuum of devotions, reflects the truth of our inner being as we are in God - the Light Continuum, inner aspects of our soul, and reflects the ‘Divine I Am,’ the Christ Self or Divine Self. So as we ‘see’ there is a play of remembering and realizing our True Being, True Self, in Christ and God Most High.

Here we may recall that on a spiritual level nearness is ‘likeness,’ ‘resemblance,’ ‘similitude,’ the greater the likeness the greater the nearness, and of course in fruition, oneness. Thus, to see something in the spiritual realms you must become it indicates the generation of likeness; the very word ‘Christian’ implies this - to be ‘Christ-like’ and to be ‘anointed.’

These were a couple of thoughts I was stirred to share. I'll pause here as the time is near for companions to arrive for our Christmas Day Zohar discourse.

May the blessings of the Holy Mother and Child be upon you this day! Amen.

Shalom Aleichem!
Tau Malachi
Sophia Fellowship
Ecclesia Pistis Sophia

Kelly Ann
Posts: 9
Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2018 3:31 am

Re: Quest. about God

#6 Postby Kelly Ann » Wed Dec 26, 2018 9:31 am

Shalom Tau Malachi (I am not sure the most appropriate way to address you?),

My heart extends the words of deepest gratitude for your beautiful and profound message. I have been working with your message most of the morning-----------------dissecting, analyzing, contemplating. Reflecting on the conception and rebirthing that occurs within the soul through the receiving and holding of the Holy Spirit. Reflecting on the process of seeing and remembering. On the process of becoming, of developing "likeness." This utterly beautiful and sacred process, this interior movement of the soul that gets deeper and deeper with the evolution of my understanding...and now, off to meditate.

In Christ's Love,
Kelly Ann

Tau Malachi
Site Admin
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Location: Grass Valley, Ca.

Re: Quest. about God

#7 Postby Tau Malachi » Wed Dec 26, 2018 10:12 am

Shalom,

Most often people just call me 'Malachi.'

Blessings!
Tau Malachi

Sophia Fellowship

Ecclesia Pistis Sophia

Kelly Ann
Posts: 9
Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2018 3:31 am

Re: Quest. about God

#8 Postby Kelly Ann » Sun Dec 30, 2018 7:07 am

Shalom to all!

I am currently reading, "The Gospel of Mary" by Jean-Yves Leloup, which is from your recommended reading list. I had read The Gospel of Mary before, but have not spent the time to thoroughly dissect and analyze it as I am now doing as I read through the book. Over the past year I have been researching Mary Magdalene and of the important figure that she was in early Christianity, fascinated by the story of how it was Mary who had received the deeper teachings of Jesus. Fascinated by the legend of how she had traveled over to the south of France in a boat after the crucifixion, along with several of her traveling companions, and how today there are shrines and churches devoted to her all throughout southern France. The stories of the Merovingian bloodline, Rennes-le Chateau, the Cathars (Albigensian crusade) have all intrigued me beyond measure.

The foreward of this book, for me, articulates so clearly the significance of the inner path: "As a path of inner awakening, as a path of deep self-knowledge (that is to say, gnosis), it (it: the interior meaning of Christianity) invites and supports the inner struggle to attend, to 'hear and obey' one's own Self, God in oneself. As Jean-Yves Leloup suggests, this is the intimate meaning of Anthropos: to be fully human oneself, the incarnation of God. This is an unknown teaching--not in the philosophical or theological sense, nor in the sense that it has never been said before, but in the sense that our ordinary thoughts and feelings can never really penetrate it. And it is unknown in the sense that we live our lives on the surface of ourselves, not knowing the one thing about our own inner being that is necessary for us to know and that would bring us every good thing we could seriously wish for...We are speaking of an unknown part of ourselves, which is at the same time the essential part of ourselves: the Teacher within, our genuine identity." (Jacob Needleman)

I believe there are no accidents, that we are each guided to the situations and relationships in our lives that are best needed to offer the lessons that the soul needs for its advancement. And, that we are continually developing in our capacity to receive. Needleman reminds us, so poignantly, of the responsibility that we each are given, of learning how to hear and obey the voice within, our essential self, and in the process, of continually developing in our ability to know ourselves deeply.

Needleman writes of the importance of cultivating a relationship between the "everyday sense of self" and the Self, or Spirit. In fact, there is much in the first few pages of this book written about this "interior relationship." And, he comments on a "quality of conscious attention and intelligence" called the nous (Greek term), or higher mind, and writes that it is this contact "between the higher and lower within ourselves" where we can access the place where deep, intimate love is experienced (this is the realm that is accessed during deep meditation/contemplation, the realm where deep inspiration/revelation is tapped). Needleman states that this is the same love that Jesus referred to when he commanded, "Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself," affirming that this is a love in which "we are obliged to recognize as the defining attribute of the essential Self."

And as each of us learn to continually refine the task of development of self, learning to use the tools that have been afforded to each of us, and as we continue to evolve in our ability to access our higher mind (nous) and to rest in this interior place where divine contact can occur, is this not our greatest undertaking? Well, perhaps even greater may be the task of radiating out to the world the gifts that we receive during our union with the Divine. The time that we each spend in the interior realm of the higher mind, in our prayer, meditation and contemplation, work that is so vital to our inner unfolding, this needs to be our focus, more so than writing about it, or talking about it. Ours is such an extraverted culture with so little recognition given to the importance of the interior activities of the soul; we hear the message all the time that we ought to be out "doing," rather than at one with ourselves simply "being." This is why a sense of community is so important, to reinforce for each of us the significance of our inner awakening.

In the preface of the book, Tresemer and Cannon describe Mary Magdalene's path as a path of "inner preparation, introspection, and inner transformation." and refer to this as a "path of the sacred marriage," as something that is to be "accomplished within." For me, these are words that imbue my path with the deepest sense of reverence, and I am aware that I am filled with a sense of gladness and gratitude for this path.

May the beautiful blessings of the Annointed One be upon you all on this day.

Kelly Ann


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